Run Docker Ubuntu 18.04

Estimated reading time: 10 minutes

  1. Docker Run Ubuntu 18.04 Bash
  2. Docker

Install Docker on Ubuntu from Docker’s APT Repository. The upstream Docker repository currently supports Ubuntu 16.04, Ubuntu 18.04 and Ubuntu 19.10. To ensure that we have the latest and greatest version, we will have to install it from Docker’s APT repository. Run the following command to add Docker repository to your Ubuntu system. Aug 27, 2019 Docker is a containerization technology that allows you to quickly build, test and deploy applications as portable, self-sufficient containers that can run virtually anywhere. In this tutorial, we'll cover how to install Docker on Ubuntu 18.04 and explore the basic Docker concepts and commands.

How can I install Docker CE on Ubuntu 20.04 19.04 18.04 16.04 Linux distribution. Docker Engine is a container runtime engine which allows you to package your applications with all of its dependencies into a standardized unit for software development and distribution.

To get started with Docker Engine on Ubuntu, make sure youmeet the prerequisites, theninstall Docker.

Prerequisites

OS requirements

To install Docker Engine, you need the 64-bit version of one of these Ubuntuversions:

  • Ubuntu Groovy 20.10
  • Ubuntu Focal 20.04 (LTS)
  • Ubuntu Bionic 18.04 (LTS)
  • Ubuntu Xenial 16.04 (LTS)
  1. Installing Docker on Ubuntu 20.04. To use the latest version of Docker, we will install it from the official Docker repository. So, start by adding the GPG key for the official Docker repository to your system, after that add the repository configuration to the APT source with the following commands.
  2. Jun 10, 2019 Step by Step Tutorial on How to Install Docker Compose on Ubuntu 18.04. Also, learn to create and manage new containers using Docker Compose applications.
  3. In order to install Prometheus on Docker, you will need to have sudo rights on your host. If you are not sure about it, run the following command $ sudo -v 1. Installing Docker on Ubuntu. Before installing Prometheus on Docker, it is important that Docker is already correctly installed and configured on your instance.
  4. Docker is a software package that creates containers for application development. Learn how to Install Docker on Ubuntu 18.04 in this tutorial.

Docker Engine is supported on x86_64 (or amd64), armhf, and arm64 architectures.

Uninstall old versions

Older versions of Docker were called docker, docker.io, or docker-engine.If these are installed, uninstall them:

It’s OK if apt-get reports that none of these packages are installed.

The contents of /var/lib/docker/, including images, containers, volumes, andnetworks, are preserved. If you do not need to save your existing data, and want tostart with a clean installation, refer to the uninstall Docker Enginesection at the bottom of this page.

Supported storage drivers

Docker Engine on Ubuntu supports overlay2, aufs and btrfs storage drivers.

Docker Engine uses the overlay2 storage driver by default. If you need to useaufs instead, you need to configure it manually.See use the AUFS storage driver

Installation methods

You can install Docker Engine in different ways, depending on your needs:

  • Most usersset up Docker’s repositories and installfrom them, for ease of installation and upgrade tasks. This is therecommended approach.

  • Some users download the DEB package andinstall it manually and manageupgrades completely manually. This is useful in situations such as installingDocker on air-gapped systems with no access to the internet.

  • In testing and development environments, some users choose to use automatedconvenience scripts to install Docker.

Install using the repository

Before you install Docker Engine for the first time on a new host machine, you needto set up the Docker repository. Afterward, you can install and update Dockerfrom the repository.

Set up the repository

  1. Update the apt package index and install packages to allow apt to use arepository over HTTPS:

  2. Add Docker’s official GPG key:

  3. Use the following command to set up the stable repository. To add thenightly or test repository, add the word nightly or test (or both)after the word stable in the commands below. Learn about nightly and test channels.

    Note: The lsb_release -cs sub-command below returns the name of yourUbuntu distribution, such as xenial. Sometimes, in a distributionlike Linux Mint, you might need to change $(lsb_release -cs)to your parent Ubuntu distribution. For example, if you are using Linux Mint Tessa, you could use bionic. Docker does not offer any guarantees on untestedand unsupported Ubuntu distributions.

Install Docker Engine

  1. Update the apt package index, and install the latest version of DockerEngine and containerd, or go to the next step to install a specific version:

    Got multiple Docker repositories?

    If you have multiple Docker repositories enabled, installingor updating without specifying a version in the apt-get install orapt-get update command always installs the highest possible version,which may not be appropriate for your stability needs.

  2. To install a specific version of Docker Engine, list the available versionsin the repo, then select and install:

    a. List the versions available in your repo:

    b. Install a specific version using the version string from the second column, for example, 5:18.09.1~3-0~ubuntu-xenial.

  3. Verify that Docker Engine is installed correctly by running the hello-worldimage.

    This command downloads a test image and runs it in a container. When thecontainer runs, it prints an informational message and exits.

Docker Engine is installed and running. The docker group is created but no usersare added to it. You need to use sudo to run Docker commands.Continue to Linux postinstall to allow non-privilegedusers to run Docker commands and for other optional configuration steps.

Upgrade Docker Engine

To upgrade Docker Engine, first run sudo apt-get update, then follow theinstallation instructions, choosing the newversion you want to install.

Install from a package

If you cannot use Docker’s repository to install Docker Engine, you can download the.deb file for your release and install it manually. You need to downloada new file each time you want to upgrade Docker.

  1. Go to https://download.docker.com/linux/ubuntu/dists/,choose your Ubuntu version, then browse to pool/stable/, choose amd64,armhf, or arm64, and download the .deb file for the Docker Engineversion you want to install.

    Note: To install a nightly or test (pre-release) package,change the word stable in the above URL to nightly or test.Learn about nightly and test channels.

  2. Install Docker Engine, changing the path below to the path where you downloadedthe Docker package.

    The Docker daemon starts automatically.

  3. Verify that Docker Engine is installed correctly by running the hello-worldimage.

    This command downloads a test image and runs it in a container. When thecontainer runs, it prints an informational message and exits.

Docker Engine is installed and running. The docker group is created but no usersare added to it. You need to use sudo to run Docker commands.Continue to Post-installation steps for Linux to allownon-privileged users to run Docker commands and for other optional configurationsteps.

Upgrade Docker Engine

To upgrade Docker Engine, download the newer package file and repeat theinstallation procedure, pointing to the new file.

Install using the convenience script

Docker provides convenience scripts at get.docker.comand test.docker.com for installing edge andtesting versions of Docker Engine - Community into development environments quickly andnon-interactively. The source code for the scripts is in thedocker-install repository.Using these scripts is not recommended for productionenvironments, and you should understand the potential risks before you usethem:

  • The scripts require root or sudo privileges to run. Therefore,you should carefully examine and audit the scripts before running them.
  • The scripts attempt to detect your Linux distribution and version andconfigure your package management system for you. In addition, the scripts donot allow you to customize any installation parameters. This may lead to anunsupported configuration, either from Docker’s point of view or from your ownorganization’s guidelines and standards.
  • The scripts install all dependencies and recommendations of the packagemanager without asking for confirmation. This may install a large number ofpackages, depending on the current configuration of your host machine.
  • The script does not provide options to specify which version of Docker to install,and installs the latest version that is released in the “edge” channel.
  • Do not use the convenience script if Docker has already been installed on thehost machine using another mechanism.

This example uses the script at get.docker.com toinstall the latest release of Docker Engine - Community on Linux. To install the latesttesting version, use test.docker.com instead. Ineach of the commands below, replace each occurrence of get with test.

Warning:

Always examine scripts downloaded from the internet beforerunning them locally.

If you would like to use Docker as a non-root user, you should now consideradding your user to the “docker” group with something like:

Remember to log out and back in for this to take effect!

Warning:

Adding a user to the “docker” group grants them the ability to run containerswhich can be used to obtain root privileges on the Docker host. Refer toDocker Daemon Attack Surfacefor more information.

Docker Engine - Community is installed. It starts automatically on DEB-based distributions. OnRPM-based distributions, you need to start it manually using the appropriatesystemctl or service command. As the message indicates, non-root users can’trun Docker commands by default.

Note:

To install Docker without root privileges, seeRun the Docker daemon as a non-root user (Rootless mode).

Upgrade Docker after using the convenience script

If you installed Docker using the convenience script, you should upgrade Dockerusing your package manager directly. There is no advantage to re-running theconvenience script, and it can cause issues if it attempts to re-addrepositories which have already been added to the host machine.

Uninstall Docker Engine

  1. Uninstall the Docker Engine, CLI, and Containerd packages:

  2. Images, containers, volumes, or customized configuration files on your hostare not automatically removed. To delete all images, containers, andvolumes:

Ubuntu

You must delete any edited configuration files manually.

Next steps

Ubuntu 18.04 Download Iso 64-bit

  • Continue to Post-installation steps for Linux.
  • Review the topics in Develop with Docker to learn how to build new applications using Docker.

Ubuntu 18.04 I386 Iso

requirements, apt, installation, ubuntu, install, uninstall, upgrade, update-->

Applies to: SQL Server (all supported versions) - Linux

Note

The following config will guide you through a process of changing the docker's default /var/lib/docker storage disk space to another directory. There are various reasons why you may want to change docker's default directory from which the most obvious could be that ran out of disk space. If you want to run Docker commands as a non-root user then you will need to add your user to the docker group. You can add your user to the docker group using the following command: usermod -aG docker user Now, your user can run Docker commands without specifying sudo. Docker Basic Commands. List of Docker Commands Manage Docker as a non-root User with sudo Command. By default, the Docker daemon binds to a UNIX socket (instead of a TCP port) which is owned by the user root. Therefore the Docker daemon always runs as the root user and to run the docker command, you need to use sudo. Besides, during the Docker package installation, a.

The examples shown below use the docker.exe but most of these commands also work with Podman. It provides the CLI similar to Docker container Engine. You can read more about podman here.

In this quickstart, you use Docker to pull and run the SQL Server 2017 container image, mssql-server-linux. Then connect with sqlcmd to create your first database and run queries.

Tip

  • It can be used with the Docker Engine 1.8+ on Linux or on Docker for Mac/Windows. This quickstart specifically focuses on using the SQL Server on Linux image. The Windows image is not covered, but you can learn more about it on the mssql-server-windows-developer Docker Hub page.
  • For Linux Mint, this problem is actually referenced in the Docker website. Note: The lsbrelease -cs sub-command below returns the name of your Ubuntu distribution, such as xenial.

If you want to run SQL Server 2019 containers, see the SQL Server 2019 version of this article.

Note

Starting with SQL Server 2019 CU3, Ubuntu 18.04 is supported.

In this quickstart, you use Docker to pull and run the SQL Server 2019 container image, mssql-server. Then connect with sqlcmd to create your first database and run queries.

Tip

Ubuntu Docker Commands Tutorial

This quickstart creates SQL Server 2019 containers. If you prefer to create SQL Server 2017 containers, see the SQL Server 2017 version of this article.

This image consists of SQL Server running on Linux based on Ubuntu 18.04. It can be used with the Docker Engine 1.8+ on Linux or on Docker for Mac/Windows. This quickstart specifically focuses on using the SQL Server on Linux image. The Windows image is not covered, but you can learn more about it on the mssql-server-windows-developer Docker Hub page.

Prerequisites

  • Docker Engine 1.8+ on any supported Linux distribution or Docker for Mac/Windows. For more information, see Install Docker.
  • Docker overlay2 storage driver. This is the default for most users. If you find that you are not using this storage provider and need to change, see the instructions and warnings in the docker documentation for configuring overlay2.
  • Minimum of 2 GB of disk space.
  • Minimum of 2 GB of RAM.
  • System requirements for SQL Server on Linux.

Pull and run the 2017 container image

Before starting the following steps, make sure that you have selected your preferred shell (bash, PowerShell, or cmd) at the top of this article.

  1. Pull the SQL Server 2017 Linux container image from Microsoft Container Registry.

    Tip

    If you want to run SQL Server 2019 containers, see the SQL Server 2019 version of this article.

    The previous command pulls the latest SQL Server 2017 container image. If you want to pull a specific image, you add a colon and the tag name (for example, mcr.microsoft.com/mssql/server:2017-GA-ubuntu). To see all available images, see the mssql-server Docker hub page.

    For the bash commands in this article, sudo is used. On macOS, sudo might not be required. On Linux, if you do not want to use sudo to run Docker, you can configure a docker group and add users to that group. For more information, see Post-installation steps for Linux.

  2. To run the container image with Docker, you can use the following command from a bash shell (Linux/macOS) or elevated PowerShell command prompt.

    Note

    If you are using PowerShell Core, replace the double quotes with single quotes.

    Note

    The password should follow the SQL Server default password policy, otherwise the container can not setup SQL server and will stop working. By default, the password must be at least 8 characters long and contain characters from three of the following four sets: Uppercase letters, Lowercase letters, Base 10 digits, and Symbols. You can examine the error log by executing the docker logs command.

    By default, this creates a container with the Developer edition of SQL Server 2017. The process for running production editions in containers is slightly different. For more information, see Run production container images.

    The following table provides a description of the parameters in the previous docker run example:

    ParameterDescription
    -e 'ACCEPT_EULA=Y'Set the ACCEPT_EULA variable to any value to confirm your acceptance of the End-User Licensing Agreement. Required setting for the SQL Server image.
    -e 'SA_PASSWORD=<[email protected]>'Specify your own strong password that is at least 8 characters and meets the SQL Server password requirements. Required setting for the SQL Server image.
    -p 1433:1433Map a TCP port on the host environment (first value) with a TCP port in the container (second value). In this example, SQL Server is listening on TCP 1433 in the container and this is exposed to the port, 1433, on the host.
    --name sql1Specify a custom name for the container rather than a randomly generated one. If you run more than one container, you cannot reuse this same name.
    -h sql1Used to explicitly set the container hostname, if you don't specify it, it defaults to the container ID which is a randomly generated system GUID.
    -dRun the container in the background (daemon)
    mcr.microsoft.com/mssql/server:2017-latestThe SQL Server 2017 Linux container image.
  3. To view your Docker containers, use the docker ps command.

    You should see output similar to the following screenshot:

  4. If the STATUS column shows a status of Up, then SQL Server is running in the container and listening on the port specified in the PORTS column. If the STATUS column for your SQL Server container shows Exited, see the Troubleshooting section of the configuration guide.

The -h (host name) parameter as discussed above, changes the internal name of the container to a custom value. This is the name you'll see returned in the following Transact-SQL query:

Setting -h and --name to the same value is a good way to easily identify the target container.

  1. As a final step, change your SA password because the SA_PASSWORD is visible in ps -eax output and stored in the environment variable of the same name. See steps below.

Pull and run the 2019 container image

Before starting the following steps, make sure that you have selected your preferred shell (bash, PowerShell, or cmd) at the top of this article.

  1. Pull the SQL Server 2019 Linux container image from Microsoft Container Registry.

    Note

    If you are using PowerShell Core, replace the double quotes with single quotes.

    Tip

    This quickstart uses the SQL Server 2019 Docker image. If you want to run the SQL Server 2017 image, see the SQL Server 2017 version of this article.

    The previous command pulls the SQL Server 2019 container image based on Ubuntu. To instead use container images based on RedHat, see Run RHEL-based container images. To see all available images, see the mssql-server-linux Docker hub page.

    For the bash commands in this article, sudo is used. On macOS, sudo might not be required. On Linux, if you do not want to use sudo to run Docker, you can configure a docker group and add users to that group. For more information, see Post-installation steps for Linux.

  2. To run the container image with Docker, you can use the following command from a bash shell (Linux/macOS) or elevated PowerShell command prompt.

    Note

    The password should follow the SQL Server default password policy, otherwise the container can not setup SQL server and will stop working. By default, the password must be at least 8 characters long and contain characters from three of the following four sets: Uppercase letters, Lowercase letters, Base 10 digits, and Symbols. You can examine the error log by executing the docker logs command.

    By default, this creates a container with the Developer edition of SQL Server 2019.

    The following table provides a description of the parameters in the previous docker run example:

    ParameterDescription
    -e 'ACCEPT_EULA=Y'Set the ACCEPT_EULA variable to any value to confirm your acceptance of the End-User Licensing Agreement. Required setting for the SQL Server image.
    -e 'SA_PASSWORD=<[email protected]>'Specify your own strong password that is at least 8 characters and meets the SQL Server password requirements. Required setting for the SQL Server image.
    -p 1433:1433Map a TCP port on the host environment (first value) with a TCP port in the container (second value). In this example, SQL Server is listening on TCP 1433 in the container and this is exposed to the port, 1433, on the host.
    --name sql1Specify a custom name for the container rather than a randomly generated one. If you run more than one container, you cannot reuse this same name.
    -h sql1Used to explicitly set the container hostname, if you don't specify it, it defaults to the container ID which is a randomly generated system GUID.
    mcr.microsoft.com/mssql/server:2019-latestThe SQL Server 2019 Ubuntu Linux container image.
  3. To view your Docker containers, use the docker ps command.

    You should see output similar to the following screenshot:

  4. If the STATUS column shows a status of Up, then SQL Server is running in the container and listening on the port specified in the PORTS column. If the STATUS column for your SQL Server container shows Exited, see Troubleshooting SQL Server Docker containers.

The -h (host name) parameter as discussed above, changes the internal name of the container to a custom value. This changes the internal name of the container to a custom value. This is the name you'll see returned in the following Transact-SQL query:

Setting -h and --name to the same value is a good way to easily identify the target container.

  1. As a final step, change your SA password because the SA_PASSWORD is visible in ps -eax output and stored in the environment variable of the same name. See steps below.

Change the SA password

The SA account is a system administrator on the SQL Server instance that gets created during setup. After creating your SQL Server container, the SA_PASSWORD environment variable you specified is discoverable by running echo $SA_PASSWORD in the container. For security purposes, change your SA password.

  1. Choose a strong password to use for the SA user.

  2. Use docker exec to run sqlcmd to change the password using Transact-SQL. In the following example, replace the old password, <YourStrong!Passw0rd>, and the new password, <YourNewStrong!Passw0rd>, with your own password values.

Connect to SQL Server

The following steps use the SQL Server command-line tool, sqlcmd, inside the container to connect to SQL Server.

  1. Use the docker exec -it command to start an interactive bash shell inside your running container. In the following example sql1 is name specified by the --name parameter when you created the container.

  2. Once inside the container, connect locally with sqlcmd. Sqlcmd is not in the path by default, so you have to specify the full path.

    Tip

    You can omit the password on the command-line to be prompted to enter it.

  3. If successful, you should get to a sqlcmd command prompt: 1>.

Create and query data

The following sections walk you through using sqlcmd and Transact-SQL to create a new database, add data, and run a query.

Create a new database

The following steps create a new database named TestDB.

  1. From the sqlcmd command prompt, paste the following Transact-SQL command to create a test database:

  2. On the next line, write a query to return the name of all of the databases on your server:

  3. The previous two commands were not executed immediately. Type GO on a new line to execute the previous commands:

Insert data

Next create a new table, Inventory, and insert two new rows.

  1. From the sqlcmd command prompt, switch context to the new TestDB database:

  2. Create new table named Inventory:

  3. Insert data into the new table:

  4. Type GO to execute the previous commands:

Select data

Now, run a query to return data from the Inventory table.

  1. From the sqlcmd command prompt, enter a query that returns rows from the Inventory table where the quantity is greater than 152:

  2. Execute the command:

Exit the sqlcmd command prompt

  1. To end your sqlcmd session, type QUIT:

  2. To exit the interactive command-prompt in your container, type exit. Your container continues to run after you exit the interactive bash shell.

Connect from outside the container

You can also connect to the SQL Server instance on your Docker machine from any external Linux, Windows, or macOS tool that supports SQL connections.

The following steps use sqlcmd outside of your container to connect to SQL Server running in the container. These steps assume that you already have the SQL Server command-line tools installed outside of your container. The same principles apply when using other tools, but the process of connecting is unique to each tool.

  1. Find the IP address for the machine that hosts your container. On Linux, use ifconfig or ip addr. On Windows, use ipconfig.

  2. For this example, install the sqlcmd tool on your client machine. For more information, see Install sqlcmd on Windows or Install sqlcmd on Linux.

  3. Run sqlcmd specifying the IP address and the port mapped to port 1433 in your container. In this example, that is the same port, 1433, on the host machine. If you specified a different mapped port on the host machine, you would use it here. You will also need to open the appropriate inbound port on your firewall to allow the connection.

  4. Run Transact-SQL commands. When finished, type QUIT.

Other common tools to connect to SQL Server include:

Remove your container

If you want to remove the SQL Server container used in this tutorial, run the following commands:

Warning

Stopping and removing a container permanently deletes any SQL Server data in the container. If you need to preserve your data, create and copy a backup file out of the container or use a container data persistence technique.

Docker demo

After you have tried using the SQL Server container image for Docker, you might want to know how Docker is used to improve development and testing. The following video shows how Docker can be used in a continuous integration and deployment scenario.

Next steps

For a tutorial on how to restore database backup files into a container, see Restore a SQL Server database in a Linux Docker container. Explore other scenarios, such as running multiple containers, data persistence, and troubleshooting.

Also, check out the mssql-docker GitHub repository for resources, feedback, and known issues.

If you already have Cockpit on your server, point your web browser to:https://ip-address-of-machine:9090

Use your system user account and password to log in. See the guide for more info.

Recommended client browsers

Cockpit is developed with and has automated tests for:

  • Mozilla Firefox
  • Google Chrome

Ubuntu Command 'docker-compose' Not Found

Cockpit is also periodically checked with:

  • Microsoft Edge
  • Apple Safari
  • GNOME Web (Epiphany)
Sorry! Your current browser appears to lack necessary features.

Minimum client browser versions

The following browsers (and up) may also work with Cockpit:

  • Mozilla Firefox 54
  • Google Chrome 58
  • Microsoft Edge 16
  • Apple Safari 10.3

However, we strongly encourage you to use the latest version of your browser for security reasons.

Installation & Setup

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Fedora

Cockpit comes installed by default in Fedora Server.

To install Cockpit on other variants of Fedora use the following commands. For the latest versions use COPR.

  1. Install cockpit:
  2. Enable cockpit:
  3. Open the firewall if necessary:

Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Cockpit is included in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 and later.

  1. On RHEL 7, enable the Extras repository.

    RHEL 8 does not need any non-default repositories.

  2. Install cockpit:
  3. Enable cockpit:
  4. On RHEL 7, or if you use non-default zones on RHEL 8, open the firewall:

Fedora CoreOS

The standard Fedora CoreOS image does not contain Cockpit packages.

  1. Install Cockpit packages as overlay RPMs:

    Depending on your configuration, you may want to use other extensions as well, such as cockpit-kdump or cockpit-networkmanager.

    If you have a custom-built OSTree, simply include the same packages in your build.

  2. Reboot

  3. Run the Cockpit web service with this privileged container (as root):
  4. Make Cockpit start on boot:

Steps 3 and 4 are optional if the CoreOS machine will only be connected to from another host running Cockpit.

Afterward, use a web browser to log into port 9090 on your host IP address as usual.

Project Atomic

Connect to an Atomic Host from another instance of Cockpit with the Add Server dashboard UI.

Alternatively you can access Cockpit directly on the Atomic Host if SSH password authentication is enabled:

  1. Run the Cockpit web service container:

Docker Run Ubuntu 18.04 Bash

CentOS

Ubuntu 18.04 Docker Commands

Cockpit is included in CentOS 7.x:

Ubuntu Run Docker Commands Without Sudo

  1. Install cockpit:
  2. Enable cockpit:
  3. Open the firewall if necessary:

Debian

Cockpit is included in Debian unstable and in backports for 10 (Buster).

  1. For Debian 10 you have to enable the backports repository:
  2. Install the package:
Run Docker Ubuntu 18.04

When installing and updating Cockpit-related packages and any dependencies, make sure to use -t buster-backports so backports are included.

Ubuntu

Docker

Cockpit is included in Ubuntu 17.04 and later, and available as an official backport for 16.04 LTS and later. Backports are enabled by default, but if you customized apt sources you might need to enable them manually.

  1. Install the package:

Clear Linux

Cockpit is in Clear Linux OS and can be installed using swupd:

Arch Linux

Cockpit is included in Arch Linux:

If the first command fails with “database file for … does not exist”, refresh/update your system with sudo pacman -Syu first.

openSUSE Tumbleweed

Ubuntu Docker Commands Command

Cockpit is included in openSUSE Tumbleweed:

Ubuntu Docker Commands Hang

  1. Install cockpit:
  2. Enable cockpit:
  3. Open the firewall if necessary: