Install Docker Desktop On Windows Server 2019

This guide is about how to install Active Directory Domain Services on a newly installed Windows server 2019. Step 1: Open Server Manager. Hit “Windows” key on your keyboard and type “Server Manager” to search for the application. Once it is open as illustrated by the figure below, let us now proceed to the next step of installing. This document details deploying a Windows container host to either Windows Server 2016 or Windows Server Core 2016 on a physical or virtual system. Install Docker Docker is required in order to work with Windows containers. I hope this gives you a step-by-step guide on how you can install WSL 2 on Windows Server. Remember this is currently in preview, and not for production use. If you want to install the Windows Subsystem for Linux on Windows Server 2019, check out this blog post: Install Windows Subsystem for Linux on Windows Server. Offline install for Windows 7. When doing an offline install for.NET Core 2.1 on Windows 7, you'll first need to make sure that the latest Microsoft Root Certificate Authority 2011 has been installed on the target machine. The certmgr.exe tool can automate installing a certificate and is obtained from Visual Studio or the Windows SDK. Thank you for reading through. In case you are interested in other Windows Server guides, some of them are listed below. Install Latest Packer on Linux / FreeBSD / macOS / Windows. How To Install Applications from Windows command line. How to Allow ICMP Echo Reply on Windows Server 2019. Install and Configure iSCSI Target on Windows.

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Deploying a Windows container host has different steps depending on the operating system and the host system type (physical or virtual). This document details deploying a Windows container host to either Windows Server 2016 or Windows Server Core 2016 on a physical or virtual system.

Re: Docker Linux Container running on Windows Server 2019. @mjfp Hello, WSL2 is integrated for Docker for Windows, but I 'm not sure if this is already supported for Docker on Windows Server. Maybe you can ask Docker support: Docker Support - Contact Docker Support because it would be awesome if this is possible. Best Regards, James. Using Docker on Windows 10 (Updated at the end of 2019) Since I wrote this originally, Docker on Windows has become a first-class supported tool, with a Windows Installer and well-documented installation processes from docker and from Microsoft.

Install Docker

Docker is required in order to work with Windows containers. Docker consists of the Docker Engine and the Docker client.

To install Docker, we'll use the OneGet provider PowerShell module. The provider will enable the containers feature on your machine and install Docker, which will require a reboot.

Open an elevated PowerShell session and run the following cmdlets.

Install the OneGet PowerShell module.

Use OneGet to install the latest version of Docker.

When the installation is complete, reboot the computer.

Install a specific version of Docker

There are currently two channels available for Docker EE for Windows Server:

  • 17.06 - Use this version if you're using Docker Enterprise Edition (Docker Engine, UCP, DTR). 17.06 is the default.
  • 18.03 - Use this version if you're running Docker EE Engine alone.

To install a specific version, use the RequiredVersion flag:

Installing specific Docker EE versions may require an update to previously installed DockerMsftProvider modules. To Update:

Update Docker

If you need to update Docker EE Engine from an earlier channel to a later channel, use both the -Update and -RequiredVersion flags:

Install base container images

Before working with Windows containers, a base image needs to be installed. Base images are available with either Windows Server Core or Nano Server as the container operating system. For detailed information on Docker container images, see Build your own images on docker.com.

Tip

With effect from May 2018, delivering a consistent and trustworthy acquisition experience, almost all of the Microsoft-sourced container images are served from the Microsoft Container Registry, mcr.microsoft.com, while maintaining the current discovery process via Docker Hub.

Windows Server 2019 and newer

To install the 'Windows Server Core' base image run the following:

Install Docker Enterprise Windows Server 2019

To install the 'Nano Server' base image run the following:

Windows Server 2016 (versions 1607-1803)

To install the Windows Server Core base image run the following:

To install the Nano Server base image run the following:

Please read the Windows containers OS image EULA, which can be found here – EULA.

Hyper-V isolation host

You must have the Hyper-V role to run Hyper-V isolation. If the Windows container host is itself a Hyper-V virtual machine, nested virtualization will need to be enabled before installing the Hyper-V role. For more information on nested virtualization, see Nested Virtualization.

Nested virtualization

The following script will configure nested virtualization for the container host. This script is run on the parent Hyper-V machine. Ensure that the container host virtual machine is turned off when running this script.

Enable the Hyper-V role

Install docker desktop on windows server 2019 iso

To enable the Hyper-V feature using PowerShell, run the following cmdlet in an elevated PowerShell session.

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In this article, you'll learn how to install .NET on Windows. .NET is made up of the runtime and the SDK. The runtime is used to run a .NET app and may or may not be included with the app. The SDK is used to create .NET apps and libraries. The .NET runtime is always installed with the SDK.

The latest version of .NET is 5.0.

Install Docker Windows Server 2019 Linux Containers

Supported releases

The following table is a list of currently supported .NET releases and the versions of Windows they're supported on. These versions remain supported until either the version of .NET reaches end-of-support or the version of Windows reaches end-of-life.

Windows 10 versions end-of-service dates are segmented by edition. Only Home, Pro, Pro Education, and Pro for Workstations editions are considered in the following table. Check the Windows lifecycle fact sheet for specific details.

Operating System.NET Core 2.1.NET Core 3.1.NET 5
Windows 10 / Windows Server, Version 20H2✔️✔️✔️
Windows 10 / Windows Server, Version 2004✔️✔️✔️
Windows 10 / Windows Server, Version 1909✔️✔️✔️
Windows 10 / Windows Server, Version 1903✔️✔️✔️
Windows 10, Version 1809✔️✔️✔️
Windows 10, Version 1803✔️✔️✔️
Windows 10, Version 1709✔️✔️✔️
Windows 10, Version 1607✔️✔️✔️
Windows 8.1✔️✔️✔️
Windows 7 SP1 ESU✔️✔️✔️
Windows Server 2019
Windows Server 2016
Windows Server 2012 R2
✔️✔️✔️
Windows Server Core 2012 R2✔️✔️✔️
Nano Server, Version 1809+✔️✔️✔️
Nano Server, Version 1803✔️✔️

Unsupported releases

The following versions of .NET are ❌ no longer supported:

  • 3.0
  • 2.2
  • 2.0

Runtime information

The runtime is used to run apps created with .NET. When an app author publishes an app, they can include the runtime with their app. If they don't include the runtime, it's up to the user to install the runtime.

There are three different runtimes you can install on Windows:

  • ASP.NET Core runtime
    Runs ASP.NET Core apps. Includes the .NET runtime.

  • Desktop runtime
    Runs .NET WPF and Windows Forms desktop apps for Windows. Includes the .NET runtime.

  • .NET runtime
    This runtime is the simplest runtime and doesn't include any other runtime. It's highly recommended that you install both ASP.NET Core runtime and Desktop runtime for the best compatibility with .NET apps.

SDK information

The SDK is used to build and publish .NET apps and libraries. Installing the SDK includes all three runtimes: ASP.NET Core, Desktop, and .NET.

Dependencies

The following Windows versions are supported with .NET 5.0:

OSVersionArchitectures
Windows 10 ClientVersion 1607+x64, x86, ARM64
Windows Client7 SP1+, 8.1x64, x86
Windows Server2012 R2+x64, x86
Windows Server Core2012 R2+x64, x86
Nano ServerVersion 1809+x64

For more information about .NET 5.0 supported operating systems, distributions, and lifecycle policy, see .NET 5.0 Supported OS Versions.

Windows Server 2019 Install Docker Compose

The following Windows versions are supported with .NET Core 3.1:

Note

A + symbol represents the minimum version.

OSVersionArchitectures
Windows Client7 SP1+, 8.1x64, x86
Windows 10 ClientVersion 1607+x64, x86
Windows Server2012 R2+x64, x86
Nano ServerVersion 1803+x64, ARM32

For more information about .NET Core 3.1 supported operating systems, distributions, and lifecycle policy, see .NET Core 3.1 Supported OS Versions.

.NET Core 3.0 is currently ❌ out of support. For more information, see the .NET Core Support Policy.

The following Windows versions are supported with .NET Core 3.0:

OSVersionArchitectures
Windows Client7 SP1+, 8.1x64, x86
Windows 10 ClientVersion 1607+x64, x86
Windows Server2012 R2+x64, x86
Nano ServerVersion 1803+x64, ARM32

For more information about .NET Core 3.0 supported operating systems, distributions, and lifecycle policy, see .NET Core 3.0 Supported OS Versions.

.NET Core 2.2 is currently ❌ out of support. For more information, see the .NET Core Support Policy.

The following Windows versions are supported with .NET Core 2.2:

Note

A + symbol represents the minimum version.

OSVersionArchitectures
Windows Client7 SP1+, 8.1x64, x86
Windows 10 ClientVersion 1607+x64, x86
Windows Server2008 R2 SP1+x64, x86
Nano ServerVersion 1803+x64, ARM32

For more information about .NET Core 2.2 supported operating systems, distributions, and lifecycle policy, see .NET Core 2.2 Supported OS Versions.

The following Windows versions are supported with .NET Core 2.1:

OSVersionArchitectures
Windows Client7 SP1+, 8.1x64, x86
Windows 10 ClientVersion 1607+x64, x86
Windows Server2008 R2 SP1+x64, x86
Nano ServerVersion 1803+x64,

For more information about .NET Core 2.1 supported operating systems, distributions, and lifecycle policy, see .NET Core 2.1 Supported OS Versions.

Offline install for Windows 7

When doing an offline install for .NET Core 2.1 on Windows 7, you'll first need to make sure that the latest Microsoft Root Certificate Authority 2011 has been installed on the target machine.

The certmgr.exe tool can automate installing a certificate and is obtained from Visual Studio or the Windows SDK. The following command is used to install the certificate before running the .NET Core 2.1 installer:

Be sure to review the dependencies required for Windows 7 below.

Windows 7 / Vista / 8.1 / Server 2008 R2 / Server 2012 R2

More dependencies are required if you're installing the .NET SDK or runtime on the following Windows versions:

Operating SystemPrerequisites
Windows 7 SP1 ESU- Microsoft Visual C++ 2015-2019 Redistributable 64-bit / 32-bit
- KB3063858 64-bit / 32-bit
- Microsoft Root Certificate Authority 2011 (.NET Core 2.1 offline installer only)
Windows Vista SP 2Microsoft Visual C++ 2015-2019 Redistributable 64-bit / 32-bit
Windows 8.1Microsoft Visual C++ 2015-2019 Redistributable 64-bit / 32-bit
Windows Server 2008 R2Microsoft Visual C++ 2015-2019 Redistributable 64-bit / 32-bit
Windows Server 2012 R2Microsoft Visual C++ 2015-2019 Redistributable 64-bit / 32-bit

The previous requirements are also required if you receive an error related to either of the following dlls:

  • api-ms-win-crt-runtime-l1-1-0.dll
  • api-ms-win-cor-timezone-l1-1-0.dll
  • hostfxr.dll

Install with PowerShell automation

The dotnet-install scripts are used for CI automation and non-admin installs of the runtime. You can download the script from the dotnet-install script reference page.

The script defaults to installing the latest long term support (LTS) version, which is .NET Core 3.1. You can choose a specific release by specifying the Channel switch. Include the Runtime switch to install a runtime. Otherwise, the script installs the SDK.

Install the SDK by omitting the -Runtime switch. The -Channel switch is set in this example to Current, which installs the latest supported version.

Install with Visual Studio

If you're using Visual Studio to develop .NET apps, the following table describes the minimum required version of Visual Studio based on the target .NET SDK version.

.NET SDK versionVisual Studio version
5.0Visual Studio 2019 version 16.8 or higher.
3.1Visual Studio 2019 version 16.4 or higher.
3.0Visual Studio 2019 version 16.3 or higher.
2.2Visual Studio 2017 version 15.9 or higher.
2.1Visual Studio 2017 version 15.7 or higher.

If you already have Visual Studio installed, you can check your version with the following steps.

  1. Open Visual Studio.
  2. Select Help > About Microsoft Visual Studio.
  3. Read the version number from the About dialog.

Visual Studio can install the latest .NET SDK and runtime.

Select a workload

When installing or modifying Visual Studio, select one or more of the following workloads, depending on the kind of application you're building:

  • The .NET Core cross-platform development workload in the Other Toolsets section.
  • The ASP.NET and web development workload in the Web & Cloud section.
  • The Azure development workload in the Web & Cloud section.
  • The .NET desktop development workload in the Desktop & Mobile section.

Install alongside Visual Studio Code

Visual Studio Code is a powerful and lightweight source code editor that runs on your desktop. Visual Studio Code is available for Windows, macOS, and Linux.

While Visual Studio Code doesn't come with an automated .NET Core installer like Visual Studio does, adding .NET Core support is simple.

  1. Download and install Visual Studio Code.
  2. Download and install the .NET Core SDK.
  3. Install the C# extension from the Visual Studio Code marketplace.

Windows Installer

The download page for .NET provides Windows Installer executables.

When you use the Windows installers to install .NET, you can customize the installation path by setting the DOTNETHOME_X64 and DOTNETHOME_X86 parameters:

If you want to install .NET silently, such as in a production environment or to support continuous integration, use the following switches:

  • /install
    Installs .NET.

  • /quiet
    Prevents any UI and prompts from displaying.

  • norestart
    Suppresses any attempts to restart.

Windows Server 2019 Install Docker Cli

For more information, see Standard Installer Command-Line Options.

Tip

The installer returns an exit code of 0 for success and an exit code of 3010 to indicate that a restart is required. Any other value is generally an error code.

Download and manually install

As an alternative to the Windows installers for .NET, you can download and manually install the SDK or runtime. Manual install is usually done as part of continuous integration testing. For a developer or user, it's generally better to use an installer.

Both .NET SDK and .NET Runtime can be manually installed after they've been downloaded. If you install .NET SDK, you don't need to install the corresponding runtime. First, download a binary release for either the SDK or the runtime from one of the following sites:

Create a directory to extract .NET to, for example %USERPROFILE%dotnet. Then, extract the downloaded zip file into that directory.

By default, .NET CLI commands and apps won't use .NET installed in this way and you must explicitly choose to use it. To do so, change the environment variables with which an application is started:

This approach lets you install multiple versions into separate locations, then explicitly choose which install location an application should use by running the application with environment variables pointing at that location.

When DOTNET_MULTILEVEL_LOOKUP is set to 0, .NET ignores any globally installed .NET version. Remove that environment setting to let .NET consider the default global install location when selecting the best framework for running the application. The default is typically C:Program Filesdotnet, which is where the installers install .NET.

Docker

Containers provide a lightweight way to isolate your application from the rest of the host system. Containers on the same machine share just the kernel and use resources given to your application.

.NET can run in a Docker container. Official .NET Docker images are published to the Microsoft Container Registry (MCR) and are discoverable at the Microsoft .NET Docker Hub repository. Each repository contains images for different combinations of the .NET (SDK or Runtime) and OS that you can use.

Microsoft provides images that are tailored for specific scenarios. For example, the ASP.NET Core repository provides images that are built for running ASP.NET Core apps in production.

For more information about using .NET in a Docker container, see Introduction to .NET and Docker and Samples.

Next steps

Windows Server 2019 Install Docker

  • How to check if .NET is already installed.
  • Tutorial: Hello World tutorial.
  • Tutorial: Create a new app with Visual Studio Code.
  • Tutorial: Containerize a .NET Core app.

Initially, the inception of Docker containerization started out with Linux as its base platform. However, over the years, Docker and Microsoft have continuously grown their partnership, creating a conveniently consistent interface for building, shipping, and running applications without the usual dependence hurdles associated with virtual machines.

Though a huge number of enterprises are already using Docker on Windows platforms, there has been a number of subtle functionality disparities between Windows and Linux containers. However, Windows Server 2019 (1809 build) has successfully addressed most of the inconsistencies between Docker containers in Linux and Windows environments.

Requirements for Installation of Docker on Windows

Docker containers are powered by a Docker engine. Though initially designed for Linux, extensive work has been done to allow Docker containers to run on Windows and macOS environments.

To run Docker containers on a Windows platform, one prerequisite is the installation of a Windows server. You can do this in a physical server machine, on a cloud environment running in Azure, or an on-premise virtual machine.

Install the Hyper-V feature on your Windows server 2019

There are two distinct modes to run Decker containers on Windows platforms: Process isolation and Hyper-V isolation. With the Process isolation mode, the Docker containers share the OS kernel with the host platform, hence they are lightweight and identical to Linux system Docker containers.

On the other hand, the running of Docker containers in the Hyper-V mode is confined to a special nominal virtual machine. This enables improved compatibility and secure kernel-level. To run Docker containers in this mode, you must first enable Hyper-V in the host operating system.

The default operation mode for Docker installation on a Windows server is the operation mode (enabling Hyper-V is optional). However, it’s a prerequisite to enable the Hyper-V isolation mode if you need to run Linux containers on a Windows Server interface.

The OS build is another crucial determinant on the need for Hyper-V mode as Windows containers should be of the same build version as the container host OS’s version. Still, Windows container images with a lower build version than the container host OS can run with Hyper-V isolation.

To install Hyper-V on Windows Server 2019, run the PowerShell as Administrator and run the commands below:

Enable-WindowsOptionalFeature –Online -FeatureName Microsoft-Hyper-V –All -NoRestart

Install-WindowsFeature RSAT-Hyper-V-Tools -IncludeAllSubFeature

Next, restart your Windows Server VM.

Prerequisites for the container host

You must enable virtualization in the hosting Windows server platform to utilize Hyper-V isolation in your containers: enable hardware virtualization for a container host running on hardware and nested virtualization in the base interface for a container host running on a cloud space or Hyper-V.

Running Docker Containers on Windows Server 2019

Before running multiple isolated applications using Windows Containers, you need to activate (enable) the containers feature and install Docker on your Windows Server 2019. Here’s the process:

  1. Enable the containers feature in Windows Server 2019.

Run PowerShell as an Administrator and run this command:

Install-Module -Name DockerMsftProvider -Repository PSGallery -Force

This command will install the Docker-Microsoft Package Management Provider from the PowerShell Gallery.

When prompted to install and import NuGet provider, type Y and hit ENTER

  1. Install Docker on your Windows Server 2019

After installing the Containers feature on Windows Server 2019, it’s time to install the latest versions of Docker Engine and Docker Client. Run this command in your PowerShell session:

Install-Package -Name docker -ProviderName DockerMsftProvider

Accept the installation by selecting “Yes”, “Y” or “A” to Agree to all the installation requests.

After the completion of this installation, reboot your computer.

Install Docker Desktop On Windows Server 2019 Evaluation

Restart-Computer –Force

You can check your installed Docker version via the PowerShell command:

Get-Package -Name Docker -ProviderName DockerMsftProvider


You can also confirm the installed Docker version using the docker –version command:

docker –version

You can opt to upgrade anytime by running the commands below on PowerShell:

Install-Package -Name Docker -ProviderName DockerMsftProvider -Update -Force

Then start the docker service.

Start-Service Docker

  1. Launch (Run) Docker Containers on Windows Server 2019

Run the following commands on PowerShell:

Start-Service Docker

After starting the Docker Engine service, proceed to download the pre-created .NET sample image on the Docker Hub registry:

docker pull microsoft/dotnet-samples:dotnetapp-nanoserver-1809

After the download, you can deploy a simple Docker container that runs the .Net ‘Hello World’ application:

docker run microsoft/dotnet-samples:dotnetapp-nanoserver-1809

After running the command, an ASCII image will be printed to the shell accompanied by the “Hello” message.

Running Linux Containers on your Window Server 2019

Install Docker Desktop On Windows Server 2019 Download Iso

By default, Docker on Windows only runs Windows containers. To launch Linux containers on Windows Server, use the Docker Enterprise Edition Preview that comes with a full LinuxKit system to run Docker Linux containers.

  1. First, uninstall the already installed Docker CE.

Uninstall-Package -Name docker -ProviderName DockerMSFTProvider

  1. Enable Nested Virtualization in case you’re running Docker Containers on a Linux Virtual Machine running on Hyper-V.

Get-VM WinContainerHost Set-VMProcessor -ExposeVirtualizationExtensions $true

NOTE:WinContainerHost is the name of your virtual machine

  1. Install the Module Docker Provider

Install-Module DockerProvider

Install Docker Desktop On Windows Server 2019 Microsoft

Install-Package Docker -ProviderName DockerProvider -RequiredVersion preview

A restart will be required after this operation

  1. Enable LinuxKit system to run Linux containers

[Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable(“LCOW_SUPPORTED”, “1”, “Machine”)

  1. Restart the Docker Service after the change above and restart the Service Docker

Restart-Service docker

To switch back to running Windows containers, execute the following command in PowerShell:

[Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable(“LCOW_SUPPORTED”, “$null”, “Machine”)

You have finally installed and configured Docker your Windows Server machine to run both Linux and Windows containers. We hope this guide was insightful.